“Menomonie’s new public library is approaching its sixth birthday, and circulation and patronage figures are everything library backers predicted when it was built.”

— Wednesday, Aug. 12, 1992

When the library moved to its location at 600 Wolske Bay Road from its old site in the Mabel Tainter Memorial building in downtown Menomonie in 1986, circulation figures had been stable at about 65,000-66,000 for several years. The number of card holders from that period is hard to determine, Dennis Olson noted, because the Mabel Tainter Free Library policy was to keep a permanent list of card holders and not update it.

One result was a list containing people who had moved away or died, mixed up with the active list of borrowers. The library budget had risen over the same period, but at a much slower rate. Then it cost $257,730 per year to operate the library. This came at about a rate of $1 per item circulated.

Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016

Golf enterprise management majors at the University of Wisconsin-Stout continue to benefit from an upcoming statewide golf event. The Golf Course Owners of Wisconsin Scholarship Fund Golf Outing, an 18-hole scramble format tournament, will be held at Door Creek Golf Course in Cottage Grove, near Madison. A portion of the proceeds help provide scholarships to golf management students at UW-Stout and Southwest Technical College, of Fennimore. Southwest Tech offers a golf course management associate degree, with a bachelor’s degree-completion option at UW-Stout.

The latest United States Department of Agriculture crop progress report shows 86 percent of Wisconsin corn being deemed good or excellent right now. Wisconsin is also leading the nation in excellent corn condition at 39 percent as well as excellent soybean condition at 35 percent. In comparison to last year at this time, the average amount of corn in excellent condition was 18 percent in the country. If this trend continues through the season.

Wednesday, Aug. 12, 1992

Menomonie’s new public library is approaching its sixth birthday, and circulation and patronage figures are everything library backers predicted when it was built. “Circulation has gone up by approximately two-and-a-half times in the past four years,” said Library Director Dennis Olson. He estimates 1992 circulation at 240,000 items, with 14,077 patrons, or card holders, listed at the time.

More than a thousand people waited for several hours last Friday at the westbound I-94 rest stop just east of Menomonie for a glimpse at Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton and his running mate Albert Gore. Clinton and Gore were on a three-day bus tour that included five Midwestern states. State patrolmen present estimated the crowd at over 1,000 by the time the buses and cars arrived at the Menomonie stop from the Allard Peck farm in Chippewa County.

Wednesday, Aug. 9, 1967

The Dunn County board of supervisors, meeting Tuesday, adopted a petition allowing Vernon L. Nedland, Prairie Farm, to acquire tax certificates through 1968 so that he can gain title to the Foremost Dairies, Inc., property in Ridgeland. According to information presented, he plans on installing a manufacturing plant in the building. He presently manufactures chopper boxes and manure spreaders under the Forage King label.

It was reported that Foremost has not operated the milk plant the past eight years and the premises are vacant and have been abandoned. The only method of gaining title to the property, it was reported, is through tax deeds. It is the policy of the county board to take certificates and therefore special legislation was needed so that Nedland could gain the certificates. Delinquent taxes on the property, which was assessed for $64,450 in 1966, are $2,016 in 1964, $2,223.54 in 1965, and $2,264.39 in 1965.

Wednesday, Aug. 12, 1942

Mrs. Edith Garrard Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Wilson, and Phillip A. Wilson have given a large marble statue, “The Lost Pleiad,” to the Mabel Tainter Memorial Association. This statue, which came from Italy, was acquired by the late Thomas B. Wilson, who built a special room for its display in the old Wilson home on West Second street. It was a part of the art collection in a large mansion on the Cornell University grounds at Ithaca, New York. The purchase was made by Paul C. Wilson, a student at Cornell University, on behalf of his father.

The statue will be displayed for the benefit of the public by the Memorial Association in the Memorial building on Main Street. The cost of moving will be defrayed by popular subscription from a group of Menomonie business men. The old Wilson home, long a landmark in this city, is being razed by Ed. Munson and his crew, and the materials are being sold by O & N Lumber company.

Thursday, Aug. 9, 1917

Two score members of Co. H, constituting the local detachment, departed for Camp Douglas Friday morning, being cheered away on their uncertain journey by a crowd of 250 citizens who gathered at the Omaha depot to wish them God speed. The main body of Co. H is still held at Superior, although most of the guard has now been mobilized at Camp Douglas. The detachment, which includes the men reserved for local guard duty when the troops left for Superior and recent recruits, stayed Thursday night at the armory in order to be on hand early for the morning special that was to bear them off to camp.

Many farm buildings were damaged the city shade trees destroyed in an electrical storm which passed over this section Saturday afternoon. The storm was the worst of the season, the lightning being accompanied by wind and in some places by hail, though not a great quantity of rain fell.

Friday, Aug. 12, 1892

J. J. Myrick, one of Elk Mound’s intelligent and progressive farmers, does not take the lugubrious view of the disastrous effects upon grain of the terrific storm that swept over Dunn County two weeks ago, that many farmers do. While great loss may result to some fields, he does not apprehend that the average loss to the county will be heavy, and is rather of the opinion that Dunn County will this fall harvest one of the largest crops known in a half dozen years.

Our statement last week that the Knapp, Stout & Co. Company was runnings its mills in this city on half time was misleading. The night run, which constitutes what is known as “double time” was abandoned. the day run continuing as heretofore.

Dr. Baker returned Monday from a visit at Merrill. He says the accounts of labor strikes in the Wisconsin valley are greatly exaggerated. The low-abiding element was in uninterrupted control and the interposition of state troops at no time needed.

Saturday, Aug. 10, 1867

After a pleasant acquaintance with the reader of the Dunn County News for two years, I have sold the institution to Messrs. Wilson & Messenger and retire on terms and conditions quite comfortable and satisfactory. Those who are indebted to the office will please call and settle.—E. G. Benjamin.

On the 6th inst., we purchased the Dunn County News, and at the same time procured the services of S. W. Hunt, Esq, as editor. We start out in our newspaper career with the present No, a greater part of which, however, had been made up before we became proprietors. In making our debut in this to us untried field, we deem it right to dictate briefly what our intentions and desires in this respect are and in the first place we intend to do what we can to advance the interests of this section of the State, and especially of Dunn County,—will try to advance all religious moral and educational movements; and in politics we shall never be neutral, but hope and desire to make our paper a resident of Dunn Co. will desire a copy in to do this, we ask the liberal patronage of the public.—W. & M., Propr’s

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Dunn County News editor

Barbara Lyon is the editor of The Dunn County News in Menomonie, WI.

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