Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
AP

Mental Health Improves With Access to Gender-Affirming Hormones

  • Updated
  • 0
Mental Health Improves With Access to Gender-Affirming Hormones

FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- For transgender adults, access to gender-affirming hormones (GAH) during adolescence and adulthood is associated with improved mental health, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in PLOS ONE.

Jack L. Turban, M.D., from the Stanford University School of Medicine in California, and colleagues examined associations between access to GAH during adolescence and adulthood and mental health outcomes in a secondary analysis of the 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey, which included data for 27,715 transgender adults in the United States.

Overall, 77.9 percent of participants reported ever desiring GAH. Of these, 41.0 percent never accessed GAH, while 0.6, 1.7, and 56.8 percent accessed GAH in early adolescence (age 14 to 15 years), late adolescence (age 16 to 17 years), or adulthood (age 18 years or older). The researchers found that accessing GAH during early adolescence, late adolescence, and adulthood was associated with lower odds of past-year suicidal ideation compared with desiring but never accessing GAH (adjusted odds ratios, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.8, respectively). In post-hoc analyses, the odds of past-year suicidal ideation were reduced with access to GAH during adolescence (ages 14 to 17 years) compared with access during adulthood (adjusted odds ratio, 0.7).

"This study is particularly relevant now because many state legislatures are introducing bills that would outlaw this kind of care for transgender youth," Turban said in a statement. "We are adding to the evidence base that shows why gender-affirming care is beneficial from a mental health perspective."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the publishing industry; one author received expert witness payments from the ACLU.

Abstract/Full Text

0 Comments
0
0
0
0
0

This article originally ran on consumer.healthday.com.

Build your health & fitness knowledge

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
TownNews.com Content Exchange

Related to this story

Most Popular

MADRID (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic was first declared, Spaniards were ordered to stay home for more than three months. For weeks, they were not allowed outside even for exercise. Children were banned from playgrounds, and the economy virtually stopped.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana House Republicans pushed through a proposal Tuesday that would severely limit workplace COVID-19 vaccination requirements even as the move faces resistance from Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb and GOP state Senate leaders.

CHICAGO (AP) — An Illinois judge who made sexist comments about an attorney during a conversation in his courtroom that he did not realize was being broadcast live on YouTube has been removed from the bench, officials announced Wednesday.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Republicans introduced a package of legislation Tuesday that would tighten eligibility for unemployment benefits and Medicaid coverage, saying the bills are designed to help alleviate what they maintain is a crippling labor shortage in the state.

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A health official who has helped lead central Florida's response to the pandemic has been put on administrative leave as state officials investigate whether he tried to compel employees to get vaccinated for COVID-19 in violation of state law.

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a self-appraisal that didn't always fit with the facts, President Joe Biden on Wednesday made the dubious assertion that he's outperformed all expectations on the pandemic in his first year and inflated his contribution to COVID-era economic growth.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News