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Stepping Up: I hope something good happens to you today

Stepping Up: I hope something good happens to you today

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The other day I was driving home from running some errands including one to a business where no one was wearing masks. I was in a funk because that makes me so mad! This side of my personality emerges that’s not nice and puts people on the defensive. Instead of sharing my concerns in a polite way, I rant. Not helpful. As I was driving, I noticed the car in front of me had a little sign on it that said, “I hope something good happens to you today.” I know it’s not that much different from saying ‘Have a nice day,’ but it hit home in the moment. The owner(s) of that car don’t even know me, or whoever might be behind them, and yet they’re saying such a kind thing to everyone who reads it. We so desperately need kindness like this these days—the kind that says ‘I care about you because you’re human. It doesn’t matter what you think about masks or what your race, ethnicity, religion, political party, gender identity, sexual orientation, or economic status is. No matter what, I hope something good happens to you today.’ These are such difficult times for so many people. Covid, racial and political tensions, and wealth disparity are on the rise. One in four workers in the U.S. have lost their job since the pandemic began. Many more have had a pay cut. The highest percentage of job losses are in the low-wage sector with 40% of households earning under $40,000 annually having lost wages. $40,000 a year isn’t much to live on for a family. At the same time, food prices are soaring. In April there was the highest one month increase in almost 50 years. Just as everyone needs kindness, everybody also needs to eat. Life is hard enough right now without also having to worry about that. At the Stepping Stones’ pantry, thanks to generous donors and suppliers, we have plenty of food. It’s available to anyone in need—no one is turned away. Curbside pick-up of pre-packed bags and boxes is easy and safe. People can come as often as needed and receive non-perishables as well as fresh and frozen foods—meat, dairy, produce, and bakery. Using the pantry can help families save money for other critical needs—rent, utilities, transportation, medical expenses, etc. While curbside pick-up isn’t as ideal as inside shopping where people can choose what they most need, one of our patrons said it’s like getting a surprise package—”you don’t know exactly what will be inside but it’s all good!” It can be very hard for people to make their first visit to the pantry. They may never have expected to need that sort of help but that’s why we’re there—to try to make life a little easier during especially difficult times. We’re there to be a stepping stone. We want pantry visits to be one of the good things that happen that day for the people who come. Pantry distribution days and times are: Mon. 11am-2pm, Weds. 3-6pm, Fri. 11am-2pm, and Sat. 10am-Noon. Please come if you need to and tell others. For more information visit:

www.steppingstonesdc.org

. Also, and I’m saying this as nicely as I can, another way to spread kindness and keep bad things from happening is to wear a mask! Katherine Dutton is the executive director of Stepping Stones of Dunn County. She can be reached by emailing director@steppingstonesdc.org.

The other day I was driving home from running some errands including one to a business where no one was wearing masks. I was in a funk because that makes me so mad! This side of my personality emerges that’s not nice and puts people on the defensive. Instead of sharing my concerns in a polite way, I rant. Not helpful.

As I was driving, I noticed the car in front of me had a little sign on it that said, “I hope something good happens to you today.” I know it’s not that much different from saying ‘Have a nice day,’ but it hit home in the moment. The owner(s) of that car don’t even know me, or whoever might be behind them, and yet they’re saying such a kind thing to everyone who reads it.

We so desperately need kindness like this these days—the kind that says ‘I care about you because you’re human. It doesn’t matter what you think about masks or what your race, ethnicity, religion, political party, gender identity, sexual orientation, or economic status is. No matter what, I hope something good happens to you today.’

These are such difficult times for so many people. Covid, racial and political tensions, and wealth disparity are on the rise. One in four workers in the U.S. have lost their job since the pandemic began. Many more have had a pay cut. The highest percentage of job losses are in the low-wage sector with 40% of households earning under $40,000 annually having lost wages. $40,000 a year isn’t much to live on for a family. At the same time, food prices are soaring. In April there was the highest one month increase in almost 50 years.

Just as everyone needs kindness, everybody also needs to eat. Life is hard enough right now without also having to worry about that. At the Stepping Stones’ pantry, thanks to generous donors and suppliers, we have plenty of food. It’s available to anyone in need—no one is turned away. Curbside pick-up of pre-packed bags and boxes is easy and safe. People can come as often as needed and receive non-perishables as well as fresh and frozen foods—meat, dairy, produce, and bakery.

Using the pantry can help families save money for other critical needs—rent, utilities, transportation, medical expenses, etc. While curbside pick-up isn’t as ideal as inside shopping where people can choose what they most need, one of our patrons said it’s like getting a surprise package—”you don’t know exactly what will be inside but it’s all good!”

It can be very hard for people to make their first visit to the pantry. They may never have expected to need that sort of help but that’s why we’re there—to try to make life a little easier during especially difficult times. We’re there to be a stepping stone. We want pantry visits to be one of the good things that happen that day for the people who come.

Pantry distribution days and times are: Mon. 11am-2pm, Weds. 3-6pm, Fri. 11am-2pm, and Sat. 10am-Noon. Please come if you need to and tell others. For more information visit: www.steppingstonesdc.org. Also, and I’m saying this as nicely as I can, another way to spread kindness and keep bad things from happening is to wear a mask!

Katherine Dutton is the executive director of Stepping Stones of Dunn County. She can be reached by emailing director@steppingstonesdc.org.

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